Modest Overview of Current Immigration Procedures Pt. 1

Many arguments are made about American immigration laws: that they are not enforced - usually argued by conservatives - that they are barbaric remnants of the Jim Crow era - usually argued by libertarians - and of course, liberals and progressives don’t really want immigration laws because we have moral duties to those poor Salvadorians who just want to come here start homicidal gangs and vote Democrat.

As a legal immigrant to this country, I, of course, have opinions based on my experiences and I want to share some of the insights I’ve gathered during my time here, having interacted with both the legal and illegal brand of immigrants. There are plenty of myths and exaggerations and then there’s the…either idiocy or brilliant evil of what’s actually happening.

First of all, I want to talk about what makes sense from the point of view of preserving American integrity through the immigration law. Most of the regulations of immigration law make some sense. Think about it, the way the system works pisses off libertarians and open-border fags, so it has to be doing something right. Discounting some utterly retarded things like the “Diversity Visa Lottery” (which I will discuss later), the legal framework would be OK if you didn’t have the giant Damocles Sword of illegal immigration and the subversion of the correct immigration process.

Before I start getting more in depth, I need to clarify that when I say something “makes sense” I mean that it makes sense from the perspective of a country preserving its ethnic identity and protecting its job market. I love America and have never thought it was a proposition nation; I know I don’t have a right to live here simply because I want to.

So, what makes sense? Well regarding things like tourist visas the US makes it easier for high trust countries (Western Europe, Japan etc…) and hard for low trust countries (everyone else). Take me for instance, I am a citizen of Europe (Spain), anyone with an EU passport can simply pay $14 online, get something called an “ESTA” (Electronic System for Travel Authorization) Visa waiver, which is valid for two years. You can even apply for one 72 hours before a trip and boom, you get it. Now you can come in and out of the States without a hassle, unless you get a bitchy customs official or something (the ones that give you shit are always women and are always black). This facilitates trade and travel between high trust nations and keeps people from crappy countries jumping through hoops to get here. Let’s talk about those hoops.

If you happen to be from a crap country like say…Venezuela, then you have to go through the US embassy in person. You have to pay more and higher fees (always in US dollars) than with the ESTA program in order to set up an interview with your local American embassy, and it HAS to be the embassy, it can’t be a consulate, meaning that often times people have to travel within their country of origin just to attend the appointment. All American embassies abroad have a simple policy/heuristic regarding the people they interview: They always assume you want to cheat and stay in the country. So you have to prove to the embassy official that you are not planning to do that because your mom is sick and you have a wife and three kids that are staying home, and shit, look embassy! I make a ton of money here so, really, I just want to meet Mickey Mouse and then come back. Basically prove to them that you have sufficient reasons to come back. So shitty people from shitty countries almost never get visas, first of all because they can’t figure out the bureaucratic hoop jumping dance (and there are no SWPL dedicated to doing it for them) and even if they do, their situation is highly suspicious, given that they have little to nothing in their home country.

In the case of student Visas you are always required to go the embassy interview and present your case. You need to bring financial evidence that you can pay for at least one year of education (plus expenses) in your desired educational institution, you need to have a sponsor (that can be yourself) that vows that you will not be a drain on the American public health system under pain of an entry ban for a non-trivial amount of years.

There are no “I want a green-card” procedures off the bat. It takes years to get a green card, even if you are sponsored by a company in the US via a work-visa the process takes years (and a lottery!). You have to work for a number of years, finally after that, apply to be a permanent resident. Becoming a citizen takes even longer, because once you’re a permanent resident you need to be so for years and THEN you get to petition to be a citizen and take the test. Each step filled with its own expenses and fees. It’s a pain in the ass…as it should be. The process doesn’t scream “open borders”.

So what’s the problem? Well, the problem is that for everything that makes sense there is a subversion that makes the system fail or have unintended (or is it?) consequences. For instance the process of getting a work permit, then residency then citizenship is so long, expensive and complicated that it doesn’t necessarily deter people who are incompatible with or alien to Anglo-American culture. People that after braving the system will have an amazing increase in their standard of living, like Hindus and Chinese. On the other hand, it may deter people who are more like Americans, but that don’t see the point of going through all of those drawn out legal procedures since they have a pretty good life already - the people of Europe for instance. The system helps a culturally similar and materially successful person come, and helps keep away undesirables but only if we are talking about vacations. When it comes to a more permanent living arrangement it often times fails. Remember that while America got pretty good genetic stock from European immigration, it did so only because Europe was in bad shape and America was in a much better position relative to them. Now living standards are not so wildly different and Europeans today have little incentives to try to maneuver through the system. But given what we know, that might change in the not so distant future.

This article is getting a bit long and I haven’t really gotten into the really triggering parts yet. I need you to be fresh for that, so I’m going to leave the triggering material for part zwei.

Bis dann!

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Non-hispanic White from Hispania.